laser eye surgery Voted Best Place for LASIK in Silicon Valley in the 2010, 2011 and 2012 Readers' Choice Awards!
Find Furlong Vision on Facebook
Contact Furlong Vision
Home | Font Size  Increase Font SizeDecrease Font Size
 Understanding Your Vision  LASIK Laser Vision Correction Custom Wavefront LASIK Bladeless LASIK LASIK / PRK / LASEK LASIK FAQs CK Procedure CK FAQs Advanced Technology State-of-the-art Equipment  Cataract and Lens Surgery  Keratoconus Treatment  Choosing a Doctor  Cost of Eye Surgery: LASIK...  Is LASIK for You?  Inside Furlong Vision  Contact Us  Schedule Free Consultation

CK FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions About CK

Below is a list of questions commonly asked by people considering CK. Click on the question below to link directly to the answer. Use your browser's "Back" button to return to the list of questions. If you are unable to find an answer to your specific question here or elsewhere on the site, please email us. We will be happy to respond directly to you.

What Do I Need to Know About CK?


What Do I Need to Know About CK?

What is CK?
CK (conductive keratoplasty) is a minimally invasive, non-laser procedure originally approved by the FDA to correct mild to moderate farsightedness. It is also being used in the treatment of presbyopia, a condition that results from the natural process of aging and affects nearly 60 million Baby Boomers. CK uses radiofrequency energy to steepen the cornea and correct the way your eye focuses light on your retina. With CK, you can "turn back the hands of the clock" and postpone wearing reading glasses for another 5-10 years.

Back to Top

How does CK work?
CK reshapes the cornea by applying a low-level, radiofrequency (RF) energy to specific spots around the cornea. This causes the tissue of the cornea to shrink in a very controlled way, creating a constrictive "band" that gives the cornea a steeper shape. In contrast, the lasers used in LASIK and other laser vision correction procedures reshape the cornea by removing tissue.

Back to Top

Who can benefit from CK?
CK is intended to reduce farsightedness (hyperopia) and presbyopia in people over the age of 40. You're a possible CK candidate if you are over 40 and:

  • have had good vision all of your life
  • are tired of the hassle of reading glasses
  • have difficulty focusing on things up close
  • have no health issues affecting your eyes

Back to Top

Can CK correct nearsightedness?
CK is intended to correct farsightedness and presbyopia, two conditions that require a steepening of the cornea. CK is not designed to flatten the cornea, the effect required for the correction of nearsightedness.

Back to Top

What will I feel during the procedure?
CK is considered painless. The most common sensation that patients experience is a feeling of pressure on the eye. After surgery, there may be some mild discomfort. Many patients complain of a foreign-object sensation or a slight "scratchiness" in the eye within the first 24 hours after the procedure.

Back to Top

What type of anesthesia is used during CK?
A local anesthetic in the form of eye drops is used to numb the eye. Some patients who are very nervous and have a high level of anxiety about the procedure may be given a mild sedative to help them relax.

Back to Top

What are the risks and side effects?
Because CK is a minimally invasive and very controlled procedure, it has very few surgical complications. During the first 24 to 48 hours after surgery, you may experience watery eyes and some discomfort, including a foreign-object sensation in the eyes. You may also experience a slight over-correction of your vision, allowing you to see better up close, though your distance vision may be blurry. Your vision will stabilize during the following weeks.

Back to Top

Will my vision improve immediately after surgery?
Patients usually notice an immediate improvement in their vision after the CK procedure. However, it usually takes several weeks for the eyes to reach their final level of correction. Most patients will experience mild fluctuation in their vision after surgery, but many will never notice it. Any fluctuation will usually subside within a few weeks.

Back to Top

Is CK reversible?
As with most vision correction procedures, CK is not reversible. Once the procedure has been performed, it is not possible to "remove" the effects of the procedure. This is an important factor that anyone thinking about surgery should carefully consider.

Back to Top

What results can I expect from CK?
No doctor can guarantee a certain result from any vision procedure. But CK can help restore your near vision so that you can read your watch, see the numbers on your cell phone, apply make-up, and do other daily tasks without the aid of your reading glasses. In recent clinical trials, nearly 96% of patients reported being "satisfied" or "extremely satisfied" with their visual outcome after having CK.

Back to Top

Should both eyes be corrected on the same day?
Generally, patients would not correct both eyes with CK. That would be like always wearing reading glasses and permanently limiting your ability to see well at distance. You could have CK on one eye and LASIK on the other - correcting one eye for near vision and one eye for distance - using a technique called monovision. In that case, most patients are comfortable having both eyes corrected on the same day.

Back to Top

Will I have to wear patches over my eyes after the procedure?
You will not have to wear patches or bandages, but Dr. Furlong does recommend that you wear clear plastic shields for the first 12-24 hours after the procedure to protect your eyes and reduce any discomfort.

Back to Top

How soon will I be able to return to work?
With CK, most patients are able to return to work and other normal activities the day after their procedure. Although recovery is fairly quick, it is advisable to be careful with your eyes and avoid any strain. Jobs that demand extremely clear vision (such as dentistry, surgery, or computer work) may be more difficult to perform for several days after the procedure.

Back to Top

Are there restrictions after having CK?
As with any other type of vision correction procedure, certain precautions should be taken to protect your eyes for the first week or two following CK. Patients should avoid getting contaminated water in their eyes for at least a week, including water from showers and baths, pools, spas, lakes, etc. In addition, sweat should be kept out of the eyes when exercising, and women should not use eye makeup for at least the first week following surgery. Also, patients should avoid rubbing their eyes vigorously for two weeks following the procedure.

Back to Top

Will I ever need glasses or contacts again?
Although the results from CK are permanent, your eyes will continue to age and you may need additional vision correction (surgery, reading glasses, or bifocals) at some point in the future. Although you can't avoid presbyopia, which is a natural result of aging, CK allows you to "turn back the hands of the clock" and postpone wearing reading glasses for 5-10 years.

Back to Top

How much does CK cost?
The cost of your CK procedure will be determined at your eye evaluation. Most insurance plans consider CK to be elective surgery, but there are a few that offer some benefit. Your employer's flexible spending or cafeteria plan may also offer tax advantages for the procedure. We can help you understand your options and what questions to ask your benefits administrator. In addition, Furlong Vision Correction offers several different payment options to help make CK fit your budget.

Back to Top